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Koshland Science Museum Explores Emerging Technology in Fall Programs

Media Contact: Museum Communications Officer, Koshland Science Museum
Phone: 202-334-1201, Email: Museum Communications Officer

Maureen O'Leary, Office of News and Public Information, The National Academies
202-334-2138, Email: Maureen O'Leary

August 18, 2009WASHINGTON – Beginning in September, the Marian Koshland Science Museum is offering a slate of public programs that explores how the next generation of technologies will shape the study of climate change, exploration of the universe, surveillance of infectious diseases, and the creation of art through science. The schedule of events follows:

Emerging Science of Climate Change
Thursday, September 17, 6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Admission: $7; $5 for students

Over the last few decades, scientists have been amassing data demonstrating that the Earth's surface temperature is rising at an alarming rate. As the science of climate change advances, researchers are developing increasingly sophisticated technologies to predict how the Earth's climate might evolve in the future. Join Jay Gulledge, senior scientist at the Pew Center on Global Climate Change and nonresident senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security; and Michael Winton, oceanographer at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, as they discuss today's powerful new climate modeling technologies and predictions of climate change over the next two centuries.

From the Big Bang to the James Webb Telescope
Thursday, October 8, 6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Admission: $7; $5 for students

The origin of the universe has been a source of fascination for centuries. In recent years, advanced technologies such as the Hubble Space Telescope and the Cosmic Background Explorer satellite have done much to illuminate how the universe began -- providing proof of the big-bang theory in the process. The planned launch in 2014 of the James Webb Space Telescope, an orbiting infrared observatory, is expected to extend the discoveries and capabilities of the Hubble telescope and provide closer examination of the beginning of time. Join John C. Mather, senior astrophysicist in the Observational Cosmology Laboratory at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and a member of the National Academy of Sciences, as he provides a brief history of the universe and discusses NASA's plans for its newest telescope. The program coincides with World Space Week, being held Oct. 4-10.

Infectious Disease in the Age of Google
Thursday, October 22, 6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Admission: $7; $5 for students

As the H1N1 influenza virus continues to spread throughout the world, tracking exactly where outbreaks occur will be critical for efforts to contain the pandemic. At this hands-on program, learn how technologies such as the Internet and mobile phones are revolutionizing the way diseases are tracked, contained, and treated. Speakers include Amy L. Sonricker, project coordinator for the HealthMap project at Children's Hospital of Boston; and Paul Meyer, co-founder of Voxiva, a company that provides mobile information solutions for disease surveillance, health management, and patient care.

Science Café: Uncovering the Unseen
Thursday, November 5, 6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Admission: $10 (includes Happy Hour, ID required); $5 (discussion only)

From creating a pipe organ out of soda bottles to designing four-dimensional objects, NASA's Dan Goods is intent on exploring the intersections between art and science. Installations he created as “visual strategist” at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory include “The Hidden Light,” about finding planets around other stars, and “The Big Playground,” in which a hole drilled into a grain of sand shows the scale of the universe. Currently, Goods is part of a team commissioned to create a data-driven sculpture as the centerpiece artwork for a new extension at the San Jose airport. Join Goods as he shares examples of his work and leads an informal discussion about integrating art and science.


Tickets and additional information for all Koshland events are available through the museum at 202-334-1201 or through the website; advance registration is suggested. Reporters who wish to cover these programs should pre-register.

The Marian Koshland Science Museum engages the general public in an exploration of the current scientific issues that affect their lives. The museum's state-of-the-art exhibits, public events, and educational programs provide information that stimulates discussion and provides insight into how science supports decision-making. Located at 6th and E streets, N.W., the museum is easily accessible by metro at the Gallery Place/Chinatown and Judiciary Square stops.